Simma Lieberman

Episode 15: Everyday Conversations on Race with Jada Imani


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Jada Imani, an Oakland, CA-based  MC, hip-hop artist, workshop facilitator, and founder of the Tatu Vision movement, is dedicated to helping co-create regenerative communities through her performing event production and hosting, healing practice, and coalition-building with communities of poets, Hip-Hop aficionados, entrepreneurs and Permaculture practitioners. She was born in Belleville, Illinois and spent half of her childhood in Illinois and Missouri.

Jada believes we are all influenced by race, and she thinks of leveraging her unique position of being from a mixed-race background to bring Black and White together.

Apart from sharing about Tatu vision activities, Jada shares her favorite cultural music mashups. Talking about Hip-hop culture, she points out the difference between a true hip-hop soul and gimmicky people. Disrespect to the hip-hop culture by such people brings a lot of disappointment to Jada.

Since childhood, Jada has loved music and gets inspired from every genre. She shares about how she uses music and performing to bring people together across race and make everyone feel included.

Talking about her experience of racism, her light skin attracts a lot of attention and has experienced painful comments from Black and White people.

According to Jada, a lot of millennials are more sensitive and interested in growth and liberation. But there is still hatred and racism among some of the young generations, most probably the effect of acquiring this hatred from their previous generation. Many of the white supremacists are millennials.

Jada says it most important to focus on your growth, peace, and love but also don’t avoid the crucial matters like racism!! It needs to be solved.

Episode 12 : Race, Immigration and the Cross-race Convo


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Conversations on Race- Perspectives  from a black Ghanaian and a white Hungarian

Patrick Tindana and Peter Kovacs: a Ghanaian and a Hungarian share stories and perspectives on race as immigrants to the US

A cross-race conversation about race with Patrick Tindana a black African from Ghana and Peter Kovacs, a white Hungarian

 

Key topics:

 

Why Patrick Tindana had to leave Ghana for being gay

 

What it’s like to be from a country where everyone “looks the same” and move to the US

 

An African perspective on how experiencing race in the US

 

How Patrick and Peter developed relationships with people of different races, and cultures in the US

 

Why it’s important to talk about race

 

Recognizing and understanding the challenges of talking about race with people who are different and people  who have been traumatized

 

Which immigrants have more privilege and security in the US and which ones are most endangered

 

Why lack of empathy for people from different cultures and race cause some people to dehumanize others

 

Hope for the future and bringing people together

 

Cultural intelligence and why it’s essential to get along in today’s world

 

The role of sharing food and stories can play to bring people together and find surprising connections

 

The role that culturally intelligent white people can play to disrupt racism and discrimination

 

Using privilege to start conversations across race and other differences

 

Intentionally seeking out and engaging with people who are different

 

Recognizing trauma amongst different groups

 

Tips for having cross-race conversations about race/the need to listen and validate experiences of others

 

What white people do to speak up about racism

Episode 10 : Black, Jewish, Orthodox Rabbi-MaNishtana


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Jewish, Orthodox Rabbi and African-American, MaNishtana enters the race convo as a voice of young Jewish leaders who speak out on issues of race, racial justice and religion in the Jewish community and beyond. He shares his experiences, perspective and  Jewish philosophy with us in all of these areas. MaNishtana is a speaker, blogger, screenwriter and author  of two books. He is the author of “Thoughts From a Unicorn, 100% Black, 100% Jewish, 100% Safe

 

Episode highlights with MaNishtana:

  • Racial stereotypes within US Judaism and the outside world
  • The intersection of race, religion and social justice
  • How racism, immigration, and climate change are all Jewish issues
  • Dealing with other people’s bias, stereotypes and assumptions toward him as a Black Jewish man and an orthodox rabbi.
  • Making the world a better place for Jews of Color

 

Relevant links:  www.MaNishtana.net

 

https://www.amazon.com/Thoughts-From-Unicorn-Black-Jewish/dp/0615747582

 

https://www.amazon.com/Ariel-Samson-Freelance-Rabbi-MaNishtana-ebook/dp/B07H4H2S2N/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1537909104&sr=1-1&keywords=MaNishtana

 

Download more episodes at www.raceconvo.com

 

Episode 8 : Collision of Race & Religion


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Guests: Deborah Levine and Patricia Mushim Ikeda

Deborah Levine

Patricia Mushim Ikeda

Episode 7 : Race, Racism and 3 Emmys Producing Oprah


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Everyday Conversations on Race for Everyday People

Episode 7- Race, Racism and 3 Emmys Producing Oprah

Race, racism and racial bias are still challenges  that people of color  have to contend with in the pursuit of success. Engaging in everyday conversations on race, with people different than you is one way to reduce racism and racial bias.

 

It’s widely accepted that a Black person in America has to be at least twice, and even three or four times as good as a white person with similar qualifications.  Growing up in a lower-income Black neighborhood in North Carolina. my guest LeGrande Green heard his father tell him over and over,  “A Black person in America has to be at least twice as good as a white person with the same qualifications to be successful.” LeGrande used those words to  propel him  forward.  He graduated Princeton on a full academic scholarship, received four Emmy Awards as supervising producer of the Oprah Winfrey Show, and the NAACP Image Award.  Even at that level of success, he still had to confront racism,  and racial bias as a Black man in America.

In this podcast episode of Everyday Conversations on Race, LeGrande talks about his journey to the top, only to lose it all and find  himself as a Black, gay man in America.

Key points from Episode 7  Race, Racism and Producing Oprah

  • Issues of safety as a Black man in America
  • Intersectionality of race, sexual orientation (LGBTQ,) and age- “So to me aging is about wisdom and about acknowledging the past, present and how I want to live my life” (LeGrande Green)
  • The reality of race and being called paranoid for calling racism
  • Race is not a scientific reality, but it is a social construct and it’s about color
  • No matter how successful you are as a person of color, you still have to confront racism and racial bias.
  • Internalized racism, self-esteem and eliminting self-doubt that is self-destructive
  • Racism, agism and invisibililty in the LGBTQ community
  • Speaking out against racial profiling
  • Why we need everday conversations on race to eliminate racism

 

Thanks for listening

Thanks for joining us on today’s episode of Everyday Conversations on Race podcast! If you enjoyed today’s episode, please head over to iTunes and leave us a rate and review to help us get our message about how to talk about race to more people. Remember to check out www.raceconvo.com and listen to other episodes.