Race

Episode 13 : African-Americans in the Executive Suite


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Everyday Conversations on Race with Charmaine McClarie and David Casey

African-Americans in the Executive Suite

 

Guests: Charmaine McClarie, senior executive coach and David Casey, Chief Diversity Officer of Fortune 30 pharmaceutical innovation company

 

Charmaine McClarie  and David Casey share  their experience in meeting the challenge of racism and bias as African- American as well as provide sage advice to other African-Americans and everyone else who wants to reach the highest levels of success.

 

Conversation topics include:

  • Why the history of slavery is not something African-American people need to “get over.”

How slavery and the history of slavery courses through the veins and DNA of people whose ancestors were slaves. The history and trauma of slavery and it’s aftermath   can never be ignored and must be addressed to move forward as a nation.

 

  • Why Charmaine McClarie says “Essential to one’s success is the ability to own your own narrative and know your value. If you don’t define yourself, other people will and their definition will be inadequate, Once you have your own narrative you define yourself and you can be yourself.”

 

Charmaine shares her experience feeling the power of going to Africa and seeing her original heritage.

“People need to know their heritage and their identity.”

 

Being African-American and meeting the challenges of advancing to higher levels

 

Both Charmaine and David spoke about not being comfortable in their own skin early on their career journeys. They were worried about how they would be seen because they both experienced usually  being the only Black persons in the room. David said he wondered, ”Will they think I represent all Black people, and what assumptions do they have?”

 

Their advice today to African-American and other people of color who aspire to success is “Don’t waste your time getting comfortable. Be comfortable now. Own your narrative and identity.”

 

Hear how both Charmaine McClarie and David Casey took charge of their careers, began speaking out and taking risks, and having conversations on race with people who don’t look like them.

 

Listen to this episode of “Everyday Conversations on Race,” to learn how to advance through barriers, racial bias, and embrace your identity no matter who you are.

 

 

 

 

Was case then and cast now and be the only one

More power when you walk in the room and see other people who look like you.

Who  do you ask

Ask people who look like you

What do you need to know

What is the barrier

What are assumptons people might make- so people can make introducitons

Knew early on and she needed to be ready to embrace her blackness or she was walking into room with a deficit

What are the contributions that Black people have made

Where did I get my narrative- my grandparents lived a good life and perservered

 

Didn’t have her first name on card so wouldn’t make assumption

What are you looking for- you’re comfortable or not

 

People underestimate based on assumptions- sure it happens-

Before linkedin- “didn’t realize you were Black or African American” I’d be a billionaire

Taught you have to outperform your peers

Back to “articulate”

 

As person moving up, she says that people who are not Black are coindescending- they don’t see her as who she is

When that happens ask why HR instead of CFO

What experiences do you want me to have?

How will we partner together do

 

Getting people to support you

Get witnesses so people know what you’re doing

Who are your advocates

If someone has a limited view of who you are, are you willing to see me differently?

Who have been your advocates?

 

What kind of support  have you had?

 

CDO of 2 Fortune 30 companies so he met the CEO

Spoke that the organizations were serious about diversity

Ability to meet with the CEO

Spent time in interview process building trust

Sponsors and champions

Be as equal as middle management where everything tends to converge

 

Often POC looking for mentors- but just 5% are people of color  so good chance a mentor will not be a person of color.

 

People make their own assumptions

 

No one gets it right all the time

We all make  mistakes and we can learn

Every time we take a risk, we can learn

Why did you think that- teaching moment

 

Your narrative is your power

Who you are

Website

Mcclariegoup.com

 

David Casey

 

 

 

 

 

David has served as a Chief Diversity Officer for two Fortune 30 corporations, positioning them both as top companies in the country for strategic diversity management.

Active in the community, David has served and/or currently serves in an advisory and board of director capacity for several national and local organizations, including the American Lung Association, the American Society on Aging, Disability:IN, Advisory the Greater Providence Chamber of Commerce, Skills for Rhode Island‘s Future, Year Up, the Urban League.  He also serves on the advisory boards for the Human Capital Executive Research Board, the i4CP Chief Diversity Officer Board and the National Association of African Americans in HR.

 

David has been published or cited in Forbes, the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, The Atlantic, Diversity Inc. Magazine, Drug Store News, Profiles in Diversity Journal, Diversity Global and Diversity Executive, and has appeared on the television series, American Profiles.

 

David holds a Bachelor of Science degree in business administration from Indiana Wesleyan University and is a veteran of the United States Marine Corps,here he served for 8 years, including Operation Desert Storm.

 

Charmaine McClarie

Charmaine McClarie is a C-suite advisor, keynote speaker, executive coach and executive presence authority who helps leaders have their best year ever. She has worked with leaders in 27 industries across five continents. Her clients include top executives from Coca-Cola, Gilead Sciences, Humana, Johnson & Johnson, MasterCard, Starbucks and T-Mobile.

 

For more than two decades, 98% of Charmaine’s clients are promoted within 18 months. For CEOs, that might mean a promotion to corporate directorship. For other senior leaders, that might mean a promotion from SVP to EVP or even CEO.

 

Charmaine works predominately with C-suite leaders and executives with demonstrated readiness to be in the C-suite, coaching them on leadership acumen, communications ability and executive presence.

 

Charmaine and her work have been profiled in People, Forbes, Harvard Management Update, The London Times and The New York Times.

 

She is on the faculty as a leadership and communications expert at the University of Missouri Kansas City Bloch School of Management, EMBA program, and is a visiting lecturer at the Smith College Executive Education program.

 

 

Please Visit my Website | Connect on LinkedIn | Watch me on YouTube

 

Click here to download a vCard for Contact vCard

Episode 12 : Race, Immigration and the Cross-race Convo


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Conversations on Race- Perspectives  from a black Ghanaian and a white Hungarian

Patrick Tindana and Peter Kovacs: a Ghanaian and a Hungarian share stories and perspectives on race as immigrants to the US

A cross-race conversation about race with Patrick Tindana a black African from Ghana and Peter Kovacs, a white Hungarian

 

Key topics:

 

Why Patrick Tindana had to leave Ghana for being gay

 

What it’s like to be from a country where everyone “looks the same” and move to the US

 

An African perspective on how experiencing race in the US

 

How Patrick and Peter developed relationships with people of different races, and cultures in the US

 

Why it’s important to talk about race

 

Recognizing and understanding the challenges of talking about race with people who are different and people  who have been traumatized

 

Which immigrants have more privilege and security in the US and which ones are most endangered

 

Why lack of empathy for people from different cultures and race cause some people to dehumanize others

 

Hope for the future and bringing people together

 

Cultural intelligence and why it’s essential to get along in today’s world

 

The role of sharing food and stories can play to bring people together and find surprising connections

 

The role that culturally intelligent white people can play to disrupt racism and discrimination

 

Using privilege to start conversations across race and other differences

 

Intentionally seeking out and engaging with people who are different

 

Recognizing trauma amongst different groups

 

Tips for having cross-race conversations about race/the need to listen and validate experiences of others

 

What white people do to speak up about racism

Episode 10 : Black, Jewish, Orthodox Rabbi-MaNishtana


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Jewish, Orthodox Rabbi and African-American, MaNishtana enters the race convo as a voice of young Jewish leaders who speak out on issues of race, racial justice and religion in the Jewish community and beyond. He shares his experiences, perspective and  Jewish philosophy with us in all of these areas. MaNishtana is a speaker, blogger, screenwriter and author  of two books. He is the author of “Thoughts From a Unicorn, 100% Black, 100% Jewish, 100% Safe

 

Episode highlights with MaNishtana:

  • Racial stereotypes within US Judaism and the outside world
  • The intersection of race, religion and social justice
  • How racism, immigration, and climate change are all Jewish issues
  • Dealing with other people’s bias, stereotypes and assumptions toward him as a Black Jewish man and an orthodox rabbi.
  • Making the world a better place for Jews of Color

 

Relevant links:  www.MaNishtana.net

 

https://www.amazon.com/Thoughts-From-Unicorn-Black-Jewish/dp/0615747582

 

https://www.amazon.com/Ariel-Samson-Freelance-Rabbi-MaNishtana-ebook/dp/B07H4H2S2N/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1537909104&sr=1-1&keywords=MaNishtana

 

Download more episodes at www.raceconvo.com

 

Episode 8 : Collision of Race & Religion


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Guests: Deborah Levine and Patricia Mushim Ikeda

Deborah Levine

Patricia Mushim Ikeda

Episode 7 : Race, Racism and 3 Emmys Producing Oprah


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Everyday Conversations on Race for Everyday People

Episode 7- Race, Racism and 3 Emmys Producing Oprah

Race, racism and racial bias are still challenges  that people of color  have to contend with in the pursuit of success. Engaging in everyday conversations on race, with people different than you is one way to reduce racism and racial bias.

 

It’s widely accepted that a Black person in America has to be at least twice, and even three or four times as good as a white person with similar qualifications.  Growing up in a lower-income Black neighborhood in North Carolina. my guest LeGrande Green heard his father tell him over and over,  “A Black person in America has to be at least twice as good as a white person with the same qualifications to be successful.” LeGrande used those words to  propel him  forward.  He graduated Princeton on a full academic scholarship, received four Emmy Awards as supervising producer of the Oprah Winfrey Show, and the NAACP Image Award.  Even at that level of success, he still had to confront racism,  and racial bias as a Black man in America.

In this podcast episode of Everyday Conversations on Race, LeGrande talks about his journey to the top, only to lose it all and find  himself as a Black, gay man in America.

Key points from Episode 7  Race, Racism and Producing Oprah

  • Issues of safety as a Black man in America
  • Intersectionality of race, sexual orientation (LGBTQ,) and age- “So to me aging is about wisdom and about acknowledging the past, present and how I want to live my life” (LeGrande Green)
  • The reality of race and being called paranoid for calling racism
  • Race is not a scientific reality, but it is a social construct and it’s about color
  • No matter how successful you are as a person of color, you still have to confront racism and racial bias.
  • Internalized racism, self-esteem and eliminting self-doubt that is self-destructive
  • Racism, agism and invisibililty in the LGBTQ community
  • Speaking out against racial profiling
  • Why we need everday conversations on race to eliminate racism

 

Thanks for listening

Thanks for joining us on today’s episode of Everyday Conversations on Race podcast! If you enjoyed today’s episode, please head over to iTunes and leave us a rate and review to help us get our message about how to talk about race to more people. Remember to check out www.raceconvo.com and listen to other episodes.

 

Episode 6: Race, Mental Health, Domestic Violence, and the Criminal Justice System


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Race plays in important role in issues of mental health, domestic violence, and treatment. Race and whether someone is a person of color or white, impacts who goes to jail, who gets help and who is ignored. Gerald Chambers, MFT at www.GeraldChambers.com shares his experience and insight about these issues and more on Everyday Conversations About Race for Everyday People. According to Gerald, research shows that the darker the skin tone, the more likely the conviction and the harsher the sentence. Want to hear more, download and listen.

Episode 5: Redemption After Racism, How to Talk About Race With Love


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Guests

Priya Klocek and Dante King equity and diversity consultants are my guests on Every Day Conversations on Race for Every Day People.

Does it help or hinder the race conversation to hold people accountable for words and actions from their past? Can we allow for change, new perspectives and education? Can we correct people with love and help them grow? When is an apology an excuse to continue racist behavior? How do we have the race convo with love?

Listen to Redemption After Racism to find the answers to these questions and decide for yourself.

Episode 2: Why Are People of Color Invisible in the LGBTQ Community?


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Guests:
Kevin Hawkins and Ali Marrero Calderon

Kevin Hawkins

Ali Marrero-Calderon

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